Introducing a Personal God and Loving Father

    Each year on one day in September or early October, the usually bustling streets in Taiwanese cities become quiet. Bathed in the light of the full moon and paper lanterns that decorate homes, families gather to celebrate the mid-autumn festival. They enjoy a sweet round pastry called mooncakes.  

    For ethnic Chinese in Taiwan and other nations, mid-autumn festival is the second largest festival next to Chinese New Year, where families will gather.

     

    Each year on one day in September or early October, the usually bustling streets in Taiwanese cities become quiet. Bathed in the light of the full moon and paper lanterns that decorate homes, families gather to celebrate the mid-autumn festival. They enjoy a sweet round pastry called mooncakes.  

    The reality of most Taiwanese families is less sweet and wholesome. The Taiwanese father is mostly physically and emotionally absent. In traditionally patriarchal Taiwan, fathers are expected to provide for the family, whilst mothers are the primary caregivers to the children. But long work hours mean fathers are rarely present. The roles are slowly changing, but not quick enough. Except for younger dads, you will be hard pressed to find a Taiwanese father hugging his child or giving words of affirmation, something children need to feel loved.  

    Many Taiwanese are performance-driven. The idea of a God as a heavenly Father who loves unconditionally is foreign.

    To top it off, typical Taiwanese society and religion (a mixture of Buddhism, Taoism, and ancestral worship) dictate that you are a good person by what you do. Children become performance-driven to earn approval or love. The idea of a personal God who is a loving, present Father is foreign.   

    In response, FEBC Taiwan’s programs on Liangyou Radio (良友电台) take on a very personal tone. ‘Not a Lonely Earth’ (不孤单地球) is a talk show for youth, journeying with them through life. Some programs are translated into Taiwanese and Hakka for Taiwan's local listeners. With the Hakka-speaking ethnic group being largely unreached, the translations are making an impact. 

    FEBC’s broadcasts in Taiwan take listeners on an intimate journey to discover a personal, loving God.


    One listener felt the program ‘The Book Corner’ (書香園地) was speaking to him personally: “I have experienced too much denial and abuse since I was a child. I felt confused and struggled when I grew up. I lost myself and could not live out love. Every sentence of the book ‘Approval Addiction’ seems tailor-made for me and inspires me. The voice of program hosts has the power of comfort. I love this program very much. Thank Liangyou Radio. The programs are practical, and truthful.” 

    Personal counselling is also offered on the on-air counselling program. Listener Tang was greatly impacted. “Although I had already been listening to Liangyou Radio, I was prejudiced and annoyed with Christians around me. I did not want to follow Jesus. Then my marriage hit a rock. The on-air counselling helped me save my marriage! That softened my heart of stone and I accepted Jesus as my Lord and Saviour. Thank you, Pastor Zhou and co-labourers on Liangyou Radio!”  


    Click here to access Taiwan's demographics.

    Click here to access Liangyou Radio’s various platforms.

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